Sermon- The Irresistible Temptation, Mark 1:14 sermons -- Sunday Sermons preaching resources
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The Irresistible Temptation

Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the Gospel of God
Mark 1:12-15

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Sermon Week First Sunday of Lent Cycle B

Scripture Summary Mark 1:14

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Before Jesus began preaching the Gospel of God, He was moved by the Spirit of God to retreat alone into the desert for an extended period of self-examination. He was about to put His very life at risk for the sake of the Gospel of God. He was empowered by God to carry out His ministry but, in His humanity, He had to deal with the question of how to use that power. Through forty days and forty nights of prayer and fasting, Jesus entered into a profound experience of the Presence of God. At the same time, He was drawn into a deep experience of Satan, grandmaster of the misuses of power.

Three times the devil tempted Jesus to use His power as the Son of God for His own purposes. "Just put yourself in my hands, the devil said in effect, "and you will gain control of the whole world. Accept my authority and we'll show the world who's really in charge." The encounter came to an abrupt end when Jesus said, "Begone, Satan! For it is written, 'You shall worship the Lord your God and Him only shall you serve'" (Mt. 4:10).

A long line of men stood at one of Heaven's gates, waiting to be admitted. There was a sign over the gate which read, "For men who were dominated by their wives while on earth." The line extended as far as the eye could see. At another of Heaven's gates, only one man was standing. Over this gate there was a sign that read, "For men who were not dominated by their wives." St. Peter approached the lone man standing there and asked, "What are you doing here?" The man replied, "I don't really know. My wife told me to stand here."

A strong case could be made to prove that the most irresistible temptation to misuse power is the temptation to take control of other people's lives. Wives do it. Husbands do it. Parents do it. Siblings do it. Politicians do it. Teachers do it. Clerics do it. Scientists do it. Friends do it. [...]

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