Sermon- No 'half-and-half' God, Matthew 4:10 sermons -- Sunday Sermons preaching resources
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Sermon Topics

No 'half-and-half' God

You must worship the Lord your God
Matthew 4:1-11

Sermon Topic Meaning of life

Sermon Week First Sunday of Lent Cycle A

Scripture Summary Matthew 4:10

Keywords

"Those whose allegiance is divided are odious," the Psalmist wrote (Ps. 119:113). Or, as another translation puts it, "I Hate those 'half-and-half' people." These words reflect the fervent anger of a lover of God against the uncommitted -- those who are forever "weighing" and "balancing" and "suspending judgment" on the meaning of life. Jesus said, however, "A house divided against itself shall not stand." We may not pass judgment on another's uncertainty. Moreover, out of our own experience, we are aware of the problems of a developing faith. Out of our own experience we can sympathize and empathize with the bewilderment and confusion that often accompanies the struggle for meaning. Still, we need to understand what the Psalmist was getting at when he came down so hard on the "half-and-half" people of his time. There is, after all, a "for" or "against" decision to be made by men and women who have been given the gift of free choice. A famous journalist once wrote ...

It is better, I think , to be wrong upon occasion than to be forever an "Inquiring Neutral." Into every life must come a time to step left or right, forward or back. To insist on a neutral, drifting, pointless existence is to glorify the donkey standing midway between two stacks of hay. It spent its whole life evaluating the two stacks of hay. It refused to let go of its inquiring neutrality. And, as you may remember, it starved to death.1

So many people seem to be discovering these days that the quest for happiness, apart from God, inevitably leads to boredom and frustration and depression, and the disintegration of marriage and families. So many people seem to be discovering these days that money, after all, is not what life is all about; that control, after all, is not what life is all about; that prestige, after all is not what life is all about; that power, after all, is not what life is all about; that a four-bedroom house and a three car garage are not what life is all about. So many [...]

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